Tag Archive: growing


About Earth’s Own Force

“For my part, however, it is not merely the thing produced, but the earth’s own force and natural productiveness that delight me. For received in its bosom the seed scattered broadcast upon it, softened and broken up, she first keeps it concealed therein (…); next, when it has been warmed by her heat and close pressure, she splits it open and draws from it the greenery of the blade.
On Old Age by Marcus Tullius Cicero

Puschkinia

 

“Whence can I then more properly begin, than from nature, the parent of all? For whatsoever she produces, not only of the animal sort, but even of the vegetable, she designed it to be perfect in its respective kind. So that among trees, and vines, and those lower plants and trees, which cannot advance themselves higher from the earth, some are ever green, others are stripped of their leaves in winter; and, warmed by the spring season, put them out afresh, and there are none of them but what are so quickened by a certain interior motion, and their own seeds inclosed in every one so as to yield flowers, fruit, or berries, that all may have every perfection that belongs to it, provided no violence prevents it. But the force of nature itself may be more easily discovered  in animals, as she has bestowed sense on them. For those animals that can swim she designed inhabitants of the water; those that fly to expatiate in the air; some creeping, some walking; of these very animals some are solitary, some herding together; some wild, others tame, some hidden and covered by the earth; and every one of these maintains the law of nature, confining itself to what bestowed on it, and unable to change its manner of life. And as every animal has from nature something that distinguishes it, which every one maintains and never quits: so man has something far more excellent, though every thing is said to excel by comparison. But the human mind, as derived from the divine reason, can be compared with nothing but with the Deity itself, if I may be allowed the expression. This then, when improved, and its perception so preserved, as not to be blinded by errors, becomes a perfect understanding, that is, absolute reason: which is the very same as virtue. And if every thing is happy, which wants nothing, and is complete and perfect in its kind, and that is the peculiar lot of virtue; certainly all who are possessed of virtue are happy.”
The Tusculan Disputations” by Marcus Tullius Cicero

 

Rue Plant

I have recently learnt that the rue can be planted as flower bed borders. I think I will make use of this knowledge. Regular pruning has an important role here: in spring it should be strong trimming, but after flowering only light. With these measures the rue plant will supposedly begin to propagate beautifully.

Cardoon

 

Cardoon

Garden in May

“May had reached its second half; the first hot summer days had already set in. (…) bright green leaves sparkled as if they had just been washed and polished.”
Virgin Soil  by Ivan S. Turgenev

Birch

Birch

Hornbeam Hedge

Hornbeam Hedge

Weigela

Weigela

Wild Rose

Wild Rose

Cornus

Cornus

Aquilegia

Aquilegia

Shades of Green

About Weeds

To uproot weeds and find a sense of adequation with our deep nature.

“Indeed, as I learned, there were on the planet where the little prince lived – as on all planets – good plants and bad plants. In consequence, there were good seeds from good plants, and bad seeds from bad plants. But seeds are invisible. They sleep deep in the heart of the earth’s darkness, until some one among them is seized with the desire to awaken. Then this little seed will stretch itself and begin – timidly at first – to push a charming little sprig inoffensively upward toward the sun. If it is only a sprout of radish or the sprig of a rose-bush, one would let it grow wherever it might wish. But when it is a bad plant, one must destroy it as soon as possible, the very first instant that one recognizes it. Now there were some terrible seeds on the planet that was the home of the little prince; and these were the seeds of the baobab. The soil of that planet was infested with them. A baobab is something you will never, never be able to get rid of if you attend to it too late. It spreads over the entire planet. It bores clear through it with its roots. And if the planet is too small, and the baobabs are too many, they split it in pieces . . .
‘It is a question of discipline,’ the little prince said to me later on. ‘When you’ve finished your own toilet in the morning, then it is time to attend to the toilet of your planet, just so, with the greatest care. You must see to it that you pull up regularly all the baobabs, at the very first moment when they can be distinguished from the rose bushes which they resemble so closely in their earliest youth. It is very tedious work,’ the little prince added, ‘but very easy.’ “
The Little Prince by De Saint Exupery Antoine